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High School lapel pins

High School Lapel Pin 

Custom Lapel Pins

 Each high school have their school logo, which is special and easy to recognize.

once have new students come in, they may will be provided a high school lapel pins for wearing. Most the high school lapel pins produced using metal material, and the color are enamel color which is durable.

 

Following are the top 100 best high school simple introduction for your reference. 

ALABAMA

Auburn University (Auburn, AL)

Established in 1856, Auburn University went through four names changes before settling on its current and longest-lasting title.

This public university sits on a sprawling 1,800-acre campus, complete with abundant student housing, dining, health services, counseling, and recreational facilities, among other amenities such as the 300 student-led organizations that meet on campus. Jordan-Hare Stadium, where the Auburn Tigers and mascot Aubie dominate the football field, is also located on campus.

Spring Hill College (Mobile, AL)
 

Spring Hill College is one of the oldest Roman Catholic universities in the southeastern U.S. Founded by the Jesuit order and located in Mobile, Alabama, this small liberal arts college was established in 1830, making it the fifth-oldest Catholic college in the country.

Spring Hill College currently offers 49 majors spread out over several Schools. These Schools include Business, Communication Arts, English, Fine and Performing Arts, Foreign Languages, Interdivisional Studies, Nursing, Philosophy and Theology, Sciences, Social Sciences, and Teacher Education.

 

ALASKA

University of Alaska Anchorage (Anchorage, AK)

The University of Alaska Anchorage (UAA) is Alaska’s largest higher education institution and is appropriately located in the state’s largest city, Anchorage.

UAA opened in 1954 as a community college, and began offering some upper-division courses in 1969. In 1976, UAA made the leap to a full-fledged university, offering the complete gamut of lower and upper division courses.

Alaska Pacific University (Anchorage, AK)

Established in 1960, just one year after Alaska officially joined the United States, Alaska Pacific University (APU) is a liberal arts school specializing in four-year degrees.

ARIZONA

University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ)

The University of Arizona (UA), which first opened its doors in 1885 (30 years before Arizona was even recognized as a state!), has evolved over the years into a first-class—indeed world-renowned—public research university.

The founders bravely decided to break ground on the 380-acre campus in what was essentially the middle of the desert. Today, the UA campus is a part of a flourishing urban city-center. The university now boasts a student body approaching 40,000 students and employs a faculty of 2,500 people.

Prescott College (Prescott, AZ)

Founded in 1966, Prescott College is a liberal arts college located in Prescott, between Phoenix and Flagstaff. The 200-acre campus is perched in Arizona’s central highlands surrounded by a variety of landscapes, including striking mountain ranges, flat desert plains, and abundant forests.

ARKANSAS

University of Arkansas (Fayetteville, AR)

The University of Arkansas opened its doors in 1871, just years after the American Civil War left the South devastated, making it the first public university in the state. The 412-acre campus, located in the city of Fayetteville, is perched on a hill overlooking the iconic Ozark Mountains.

Hendrix College (Conway, AR)

Hendrix College is a private liberal art college that is affiliated with the United Methodist Church, but teaches a secular curriculum. The four-year private college, which opened in 1876, is located in Conway, just 30 minutes from the state capital of Little Rock.

CALIFORNIA

Stanford University (Stanford, CA)

Stanford University, officially entitled Leland Stanford Junior University, is a private research university located in the Silicon Valley between San Francisco and San Jose. Founded in 1891, the university was established as a coeducational school with no denominational affiliations, which was rare at the time.

Harvey Mudd College (Claremont, CA)

Founded in 1955, Harvey Mudd College is a private, coeducational liberal arts college focusing on engineering, science, and mathematics.

Harvey Mudd College is accredited by the Accrediting Commission for Senior Colleges and Universities of the Western Association of Schools and Colleges.

COLORADO

University of Denver (Denver, CO)

Established in 1864, the University of Denver opened just a few short years after Denver officially became a city recognized by the state of Colorado. In fact, the University of Denver (abbreviated as DU) is the oldest private university is the Rocky Mountain region. Originally founded as a Methodist seminary and still legally operating under the name Colorado Seminary, the university no longer adheres to any religious affiliation or teaches a specifically religious curriculum.

The University of Denver is accredited by the Higher Learning Commission of the North Central Association.

Colorado College (Colorado Springs, CO)

Founded in 1874, Colorado College (CC) is a private liberal arts college located in Colorado Springs. The school currently offers 42 majors is fields such as anthropology, art, biology, Classics, education, and many others.

CONNECTICUT

Yale University (New Haven, CT)

With roots planted as early as the 1640s, Yale University officially opened its doors in 1701. Originally named Collegiate School, and operating as Yale College before settling on Yale University in 1887, this university is world-renowned.

Connecticut College (New London, CT)

Established in 1911, Connecticut College is a liberal arts college located in the old seaport town of New London. Originally opened as Connecticut College for Women after Wesleyan University stopped admitting women, the college has since gone coed. Flanked on one side by the Thames River and Long Island Sound and on the other by an arboretum, the campus is immersed in the natural New England beauty.

DELAWARE

University of Delaware (Newark, DE)

Founded in 1743 as a small private college, the University of Delaware has since grown greatly in both size and stature. The main campus, located in the small town of Newark, is part of the greater University of Delaware system which includes campuses all over the state, including in Dover, Wilmington, Lewes, and Georgetown.

Wesley College (Dover, DE)

Wesley College was founded in 1873 as a college prep school named Wilmington Conference Academy. today, it is a private liberal arts college affiliated with the United Methodist Church. It is the oldest private college in the state. While the school remains a United Methodist institution, it strives to foster a values-based education that is available to students of all faiths.

FLORIDA

University of Florida (Gainesville, FL)

Established in 1853 and relocated in 1906 to its current location—where it is comfortably settled on a 2000-acre campus—the University of Florida at Gainesville (often shorted to UF) is a premier public research university.

New College of Florida (Sarasota, FL)

New College of Florida, located in sunny Sarasota, is a public liberal arts college founded in 1964. From its inception, the school has been open to people of all races, genders, and religious affiliations, which was very progressive for a southern college at the time. Originally established as a private institute, the school was eventually absorbed by the State University of Florida system, in which it is now included as an autonomous honors college.

GEORGIA

Emory University (Atlanta, GA)

Founded in 1836 by local Methodists, Emory is a private research university. The 631-acre campus is located in the Druid Hills neighborhood of the greater Atlanta Metropolitan area.

Morehouse College (Atlanta, GA)

Established in 1867, just two years after the Civil War left Atlanta and much of the south ravaged, Morehouse College is a private, all male, liberal arts college. The college was founded as a school for black students and maintains that tradition to this day. However, men of any race are welcome to apply for admission.

HAWAII

University of Hawaii Manoa (Honolulu, HI)

The University of Hawaii (UH), which traces its roots to a land grant college founded in 1907, is a public coed research university governed by the Hawaii state legislature. Operating as the flagship campus for the University of Hawaii system, UH Manoa (note that the accent is on the first syllable: Mahn’-oh-ah), is located in the Manoa valley, one of Honolulu’s nicest neighborhoods, on the island of Oahu.

Hawaii Pacific University, Hawaii Loa Campus (Kaneohe, HI)

The Hawaii Loa Campus of Hawaii Pacific University was originally founded as Christian College of the Pacific in 1963. For many years, the school was known as Hawaii Loa College, a four-year, liberal arts college located in Kaneohe, on the windward side of the island of Oahu, on the other side of the Ko’olau mountain range from Honolulu.

IDAHO

University of Idaho (Moscow, ID)

The University of Idaho, that state’s premier research university, was founded in 1889, making it also the oldest public university in the state. The nearly 1600-acre campus is located 2600 feet above sea level in the rural community of Moscow, just north of Lewiston in the Idaho panhandle, on the Washington state border. It is the largest institution of higher learning in the state, and contains a regulation-size, 18-hole golf course, an arboretum, a botanical garden, and 860 acres of farmland.

College of Idaho (Caldwell, ID)

Founded in 1891 in conjunction with local Presbyterian Church leaders, the College of Idaho is a liberal arts college located in Caldwell, a suburb west of Boise. The 50-acre campus is home away from home to 1042 students.

ILLINOIS

University of Chicago (Chicago, IL)

Founded in 1890 by the American Baptist Education Society, the University of Chicago is a private, nondenominational, coeducational research university. Current student enrollment is almost 15,000 students, made up primarily of graduate and professional studies students. In fact, the student body consists of almost twice as many graduate students as undergraduates.

Wheaton College (Wheaton, IL)

Wheaton College is a coeducational, private, interdenominational Christian liberal arts college located in the small town of Wheaton, Illinois. The 80-acre campus is located just 25 miles west of downtown Chicago. Wheaton is deeply historical: It was a stop on the Underground Railroad thanks to the school’s very first president, Jonathan Blanchard, who was an active abolitionist.

INDIANA

Purdue University (West Lafayette, IN)

Founded in 1869, Purdue University is a public research university whose main campus is located in West Lafayette, Indiana, a small town in the northeastern corner of the state about halfway between Indianapolis and Gary. The school’s program breadth is wide, with over 200 undergraduate majors, 70 master’s degrees, and professional programs in both pharmaceutical and veterinary medicine.

Wabash College (Crawfordsville, IN)

Wabash College is a small, 60-acre, all-men’s private liberal arts college located in Crawfordsville, Indiana, just 45 miles northwest of the state capital of Indianapolis and not far from Purdue. Founded in 1832, the college is one of just three remaining all-men’s liberal art colleges.

IOWA

University of Iowa (Iowa City, IA)

The University of Iowa at Iowa City is a public research university and the flagship campus of the University of Iowa System. Founded in 1847, the university came to life just 59 days after Iowa officially became a state. Now, it contains a student body of over 31,000 students and offers degrees in 200 plus areas of study.

Grinnell College (Grinnell, IA)

Founded in 1846 and historically linked to the Methodist Church, Grinnell College is a private, secular, liberal arts college in the small town of Grinnell, Iowa. The 120-acre rural campus is located halfway between Des Moines and Iowa City. The school also owns 365 acres which are used as an environmental research center.

KANSAS

University of Kansas (Lawrence, KS)

The University of Kansas (often referred to as KU) is a public research library located in Lawrence, Kansas. Midway between Topeka and Kansas City, the 1,100-acre campus has gently nudged the encompassing city into becoming a bona fide college town. Established in 1866, the university is now the largest in the state, with an enrollment of nearly 28,000 students, most of whom attend school at the main campus in Lawrence.

Benedictine College (Atchison,KS)

Established in 1971 as a result of a merger between St. Benedict’s College for men (founded in 1850) and Mount St. Scholastica College for Women (founded in 1923), Benedictine College is a private, coeducational, residential, undergraduate liberal arts college. The college is located on the bluffs that overlook the Missouri River in the rural town of Atchison, Kansas.

KENTUCKY

University of Kentucky (Lexington, KY)

The University of Kentucky (UK) is a public, coeducational, research university located in the rolling hills of Lexington. Originally founded as the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Kentucky in 1865, the university has since widened the breadth of its academic offerings and grown into the largest university in the state.

Berea College (Berea, KY)

Berea College is a full-participation, work-study, liberal arts college located in the rural town of Berea, Kentucky, south of Lexington. Established in 1855, the college was the first school in the South to be coeducational and racially integrated.

LOUISIANA

Tulane University (New Orleans, LA)

Established as a public medical college in 1834, converted to a comprehensive college in 1847, and finally privatized in 1884, Tulane University is a private, nonsectarian, research university located in uptown New Orleans. The 110-acre campus is all southern charm, from its oak-lined walkways to the historic buildings which have been so lovingly repaired and restored after the catastrophe of Hurricane Katrina.

Centenary College of Louisiana (Shreveport, LA)

Centenary College of Louisiana (CCL) is a private, four-year, arts and sciences college affiliated with the Methodist church. Founded in 1825, the college encompasses 116 urban acres just two miles south of Shreveport, the state’s second-largest city.

MAINE

University of Maine (Orono, ME)

The University of Maine is a public research university and the flagship school for the statewide University of Maine System. Established in 1865, the campus—located north of Bangor on Marsh Island, between the Penobscot and Stillwater Rivers—comprises 660 acres of green, unspoiled, small-town beauty. With 11,000 students, the university is the largest school in the state, and its only research institution.

Bowdoin College (Brunswick, ME)

Founded in 1794, Bowdoin College is a historically prosperous, private, liberal arts college located in the coastal town of Brunswick, between Freeport and Portland. The college, which became coed in 1971, currently hosts a student body of 1,839 individuals.

MARYLAND

Johns Hopkins University (Baltimore, MD)

Johns Hopkins University is a not-for-profit, private research university located in Baltimore. Founded in 1876, this university pioneered the idea of a modern research university in the United States, based on the German model. The campus is spread out all over the city of Baltimore, and the university also has satellite locations in Washington, D.C, Italy, Singapore, and China.

St. John’s College (Annapolis, MD)

St. John’s College at Annapolis is a private liberal arts college well known for its ultra-rigorous, Great Books–only curriculum. The school was initially founded in 1696 as King William’s Preparatory School. The prep school eventually added a collegiate charter in 1784, making St. John’s is one of the oldest higher-education institutions in the nation. Since 1964, it has had a sister campus in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

MASSACHUSETTS

Harvard University (Cambridge, MA)

Harvard University is a private, Ivy League, research university located in Cambridge, Massachusetts, north and west of the Charles River, which separates the town from Boston. Established in 1635 as a school for training Congregationalist and Unitarian clergy, Harvard is the oldest institution of higher learning in the United States.

Williams College (Williamstown, MA)

Established in 1793, Williams College is a private liberal arts college located in Williamstown, a small town tucked into the far northwest corner of the state. Originally an all-men’s college, Williams embraced a coeducational model in 1970. The campus spans 450 acres among the Berkshire Mountains, known for their spring and summer greenery and brilliant fall colors.

MICHIGAN

University of Michigan (Ann Arbor, MI)

The University of Michigan (often referred to as U of M, or just Michigan) is one of the nation’s premier public research universities. The university was established in 1817 in nearby Detroit, a full two decades before the Michigan Territory even became a state . It moved to its current campus in 1837. Due to the caliber and breadth of education available at U of M, the university is considered one of a handful of “Public Ivies,” where students can obtain an education on a par with that offered by the Ivy League schools.

Hillsdale College (Hillsdale, MI)

Hillsdale College is a liberal arts college located in the town of Hillsdale, in the south-central part of the state. The school was founded in 1844 by local Baptists but did not move to its current 200-acre rural campus until 1853. It no longer holds any religious affiliation.

MINNESOTA

University of Minnesota-Twin Cities (Minneapolis, MN)

The University of Minnesota-Twin Cities is a premier public research university consisting of twin campuses located five miles apart in Minneapolis and St. Paul, whence its appellation. It is the oldest and largest university within the University of Minnesota system. Both campuses together comprise 2,730 urban acres.

Carleton College (Northfield, MN)

Founded in 1886, Carleton College is a coeducational liberal arts college located in Northfield, just south of the Twin Cities. The college has a current enrollment of 2,055 undergraduates and offers 36 different majors. The 1,040-acre rural campus sits on a hill overlooking the Cannon River.

MISSISSIPPI

University of Mississippi (Oxford, MS)

Founded in 1848, the University of Mississippi (universally known as “Ole Miss”) is a public research university located in the small town of Oxford, in the north-west portion of the state. It is the oldest public higher-learning institution is the state, and was the only one for the first 73 years of its life. Originally, it was an all-men’s school, but it opened its doors to women in 1882.

Millsaps College (Jackson, MS)

Millsaps College is a private, liberal arts college situated on a 103-acre campus that is a quiet sanctuary within the urban bustle of Jackson, the state capital. Founded in 1890 by the United Methodist Church, the college is home to 985 students, 86 percent of whom live on campus.

MISSOURI

Washington University in St. Louis (St. Louis, MO)

Washington University in St. Louis (WUSTL) is a private, research university located in the suburbs of St. Louis, Missouri. Founded in 1853 as simply Washington University (the phrase “in St. Louis” was added only in 1976), the university now hosts more than 14,000 students. Despite the relatively large student body, WUSTL currently maintains an impressive seven-to-one student-to-faculty ratio.

College of the Ozarks (Point Lookout, MO)

Founded in 1906, College of the Ozarks is a private, Christian liberal arts college in the small town of Point Lookout, in the Ozark Mountains just south of Branson. The current student enrollment is approximately 1500 individuals; the college maintains a 13-to-one student-to-faculty ratio.

MONTANA

University of Montana (Missoula, MT)

The University of Montana is a public research university. Established in 1893, six years before Montana officially became a state, the university serves as the flagship school for the rest of the University of Montana System. The 220-acre main campus sits at the foot of Mount Sentinel, one of the most recognizable state landmarks—thanks to the huge M painted on the side of the mountain!

Carroll College (Helena, MT)

Founded in 1909, Carroll College is a private, Catholic liberal arts college located in the state capital of Helena. The school is dedicated to freedom of inquiry and information through investigation, reflection, sound judgment, and understanding.

NEBRASKA

University of Nebraska (Lincoln, NE)

The University of Nebraska is a public research university located in the state capital of Lincoln. Founded in 1869, it is the state’s oldest and largest university, and serves as the flagship school for the University of Nebraska system. The main campus comprises 612 acres, split into two separate campuses two miles apart. Statewide, the university owns over 45,000 acres.

Nebraska Wesleyan University (Lincoln, NE)

Founded in 1887, Nebraska Wesleyan University is a private, coeducational, liberal arts institution associated with the United Methodist Church. Like the University of Nebraska, it is located in the state capital, Lincoln.

NEVADA

University of Nevada Reno (Reno, NV)

Founded in 1874, the University of Nevada Reno (UNR) is a public teaching and research university located just 30 minutes north of stunningly beautiful Lake Tahoe. Although the Nevada System of Higher Education also includes the University of Nevada Las Vegas, the Reno campus remains the only land-grant, research university in the state.

Sierra Nevada College (Incline Village, NV)

Founded in 1969, Sierra Nevada College is a private, liberal arts college located in the rural community of Incline Village, on the northern shore of Lake Tahoe. The college stands by a teaching model that is true to the heart of liberal arts: They encourage students to learn how to apply their skills to real-life and workplace situations.

NEW HAMPSHIRE

Dartmouth College (Hanover, NH)

Established in 1769, Dartmouth is a private, research university located in the town of Hanover, northwest of Manchester on the Vermont state line. With only about 6,300 students currently enrolled and a campus of 269 rural acres, it is the smallest university in the Ivy League.

Thomas More College of Liberal Arts (Merrimack, NH)

Thomas More College of Liberal Arts is a private, Roman Catholic, liberal arts school located in Merrimack, New Hampshire (it should not be confused with the Thomas More College in Kentucky). Established in 1978, what this school lacks in longevity is makes up for with its Great Books core curriculum and guaranteed study abroad program.

NEW JERSEY

Princeton University (Princeton, NJ)

Princeton University, a private, research university located in Princeton, New Jersey, is one of the preeminent “Ivy League” schools in the United States. Founded in 1746 as the College of New Jersey, it is one of the nine colonial colleges established before the American Revolution. Many famous names are associated with the university, from Jonathan Edwards to Woodrow Wilson to Albert Einstein.

Ramapo College of New Jersey (Mahwah, NJ)

Established in 1969, Ramapo College is a coeducational, public, liberal arts and professional studies institution located in Mahwah, in the northeast corner of the Garden State, not far from New York City. The 300-acres campus is nestled in the Ramapo Mountains and is currently home to some 6,000 students.

NEW MEXICO

University of New Mexico (Albuquerque, NM)

The University of New Mexico (UNM) is a public, research university, whose flagship campus is located in the state’s largest city, Albuquerque. It is the largest post-secondary institution in the state. Established in 1889, the university now has a student body of over 35,000 individuals. Situated on a 600-acre campus just one mile east of downtown, the university is home to four on-campus museums.

St. John’s College Santa Fe (Santa Fe, NM)

Founded in 1964, St. John’s College Santa Fe is the much-younger sister school to St. John’s College in Annapolis, Maryland (see above). Like its older sibling, St. John’s Santa Fe maintains a highly rigorous, all–Great Books curriculum, a four year program that ensures all students will read the original texts of Western Civilization’s most important and influential contributors to the fields of philosophy, theology, mathematics, science, music, poetry, and literature.

NEW YORK

Columbia University (New York, NY)

Columbia University is a private, research university and a member of the famous “Ivy League.” Founded in 1754, it is the oldest institutions of higher learning in the state of New York, and the fifth-oldest in the country. It is also one of nine colonial colleges founded before the American Revolution began. In fact, the university was originally chartered by King George II.

Vassar College (Poughkeepsie, NY)

Vassar College is a private, liberal, coeducational, liberal arts college located in Poughkeepsie, on the Hudson River about halfway between New York City and Albany. Founded in 1861 as a women’s college, and originally one of “Seven Sisters” (the all-women’s Ivy League), Vassar did not admit men until 1969.

NORTH CAROLINA

Duke University (Durham, NC)

Duke University is private research university located in Durham, North Carolina. Founded by a group of Quakers and Methodists in 1835, the university serves 14,000 student, 8,100 of whom are pursuing postgraduate degreea. The university, which no longer has any religious affiliation, went through five names changes before finally settling on Duke.

Davidson College (Davidson, NC)

Davidson College is a private, liberal arts college located on a 665-acre campus in Davidson, North Carolina, just north of Charlotte. Opened in 1837 by local Presbyterians, the college’s goal, both then and now, has always been to teach openness and respect for all people and religions. Affirming high ethical principles, as well as high academic standards, the college has produced 23 Rhodes Scholars.

NORTH DAKOTA

University of North Dakota (Grand Forks, ND)

The University of North Dakota (UND) is a public, research university whose flagship campus is located in Grand Forks, the third-largest city in the state with a population of about 53,000 souls, 15,000 of whom are students at the university.

University of Jamestown (Jamestown, ND)

The University of Jamestown is a private, coeducational, liberal arts college founded by the Presbyterian Church in 1883. Located in the town of Jamestown, about 100 miles east of the state capital, Bismark, the school was known as Jamestown College until August 2013, when it adopted its present name.

OHIO

Ohio State University (Columbus, OH)

Ohio State University is a public, research university located in the state capital of Columbus. Established in 1870 and known as one of the “Public Ivies,” the university has a student body of nearly 58,000 individuals—the third-largest school in the nation. The campus, comprising 1,765 urban acres, is located less than three miles from the city center.

Oberlin College (Oberlin, OH)

Oberlin College is a private, liberal arts college located in the small town of Oberlin, about halfway between Cleveland and Sandusky. The college and the town were both founded a pair of Presbyterian ministers in 1833. The college was the first institution of higher learning in the nation to regularly admit women and black students, as ell as the first college to have coed dorms.

OKLAHOMA

University of Oklahoma (Norman, OK)

The University of Oklahoma (OU) is a public, research university located in a suburb south of the Oklahoma City, the capital and largest city in the state. The university was founded in 1890, 17 years before Oklahoma achieved statehood. The Norman campus is the flagship school for the University of Oklahoma System.

University of Science and Arts of Oklahoma (Chickasha, OK)

The University of Science and Arts of Oklahoma (USAO) is a public, coeducational, liberal arts college located in Chickasha, a small town to the southwest of Oklahoma City. It is the only public college in the state with a liberal arts–focused curriculum. Founded in 1908 as a women’s school, the college has a current enrollment of approximately 1200 students, the vast majority of whom live on campus in one of the two residence halls.

OREGON

University of Oregon (Eugene, OR)

The University of Oregon is a public, research, university located in the college town of Eugene, small 65 miles south of the state capital in Salem. Founded in 1876, with nearly 21,000 undergraduates and 400 post-graduate students today, the Eugene campus is the flagship school for the entire University of Oregon System.

Reed College (Portland, OR)

Reed College is a private, independent, liberal arts school located in Portland, the major metropolitan area in the state. Founded in 1908, the school now has an enrollment of 1,442 undergraduate and 29 graduate students.

PENNSYLVANIA

University of Pennsylvania (Philadelphia, PA)

The University of Pennsylvania, universally known as “Penn,” is a private, research university located on the near West side of Philadelphia. Founded in 1740 by Benjamin Franklin, the 992-acre campus is a member of the Ivy League and one of the nine colonial colleges founded before the American Revolution.

Swarthmore College (Swarthmore, PA)

Swarthmore College is a private, liberal arts college located in Swarthmore, Pennsylvania, just eleven miles from downtown Philadelphia on the famous “Main Line.” The college was established in 1864 by local Quakers, and is considered one of the “Little Ivies.” In 1933, the school dropped its religious affiliation. Today, the college has a student enrollment of nearly 1600 individuals.

RHODE ISLAND

Brown University (Providence, RI)

Brown University is a private, research university located in Providence, Rhode Island. Established in 1764, it is the seventh-oldest higher education institution in the United States, and boasts the oldest undergraduate engineering program in the country. It was also the first university to accept students regardless of religious affiliation.

Providence College (Providence, RI)

Established in 1917, Providence College is a private, coeducational, Roman Catholic university located in the Rhode Island state capital. The college, which sits on 105 urban acres, specializes in liberal arts. The student body comprises nearly 3,900 undergraduates and 529 graduate students. It is the only college in the United States registered under the Dominican Order of Friars.

SOUTH CAROLINA

Clemson University (Clemson, SC)

Originally an all-male military college, today Clemson University is a public, land-grant and sea-grant, coeducational, research university located in Clemson, South Carolina, southwest of Greenville. The school was founded by the South Carolina legislature in 1889 with money left to the state for that purpose in the will of Thomas Green Clemson. Clemson’s fortune largely derived from his wife, Anna Maria Calhoun Clemson, who was the daughter of statesman, philosopher, and seventh Vice President of the United States, John C. Calhoun.

Wofford College (Spartanburg, SC)

Wofford College is a private, liberal arts college in Spartanburg, South Carolina, northeast of Greenville. Founded in 1854 just before the onslaught of the Civil War, Wofford is one of the very few four-year colleges that remained open throughout the war and is still operating today.

SOUTH DAKOTA

University of South Dakota (Vermillion, SD)

The University of South Dakota (USD) is a public, research university located in the small town of Vermillion on dramatic bluffs overlooking the Missouri River not far upstream from Sioux City, Iowa, at the point where South Dakota, Iowa, and Nebraska all meet. Established in 1862 by the Dakota Territory legislature—37 years before South Dakota attained statehood—it is the oldest university in the state and the flagship school for the University of South Dakota system.

Augustana College (Sioux Falls, SD)

Augustana College, affectionately known as “Augie,” is a private, liberal arts college located in Sioux Falls, the largest city in South Dakota. The 100-acre campus was founded in 1860 and is maintained by the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America. The primary goals of the school as an educator are outlined in their core values: Christianity, liberal arts, excellence, and community aid. The college, which should not be confused with the similarly named school in Illinois, is the largest private institution of higher learning in the state.

TENNESSEE

Vanderbilt University (Nashville, TN)

Founded in 1873, Vanderbilt University is a private, research university in Nashville, Tennessee’s capital and second-largest city. The 330-acre campus is just a mile and a half from the heart of downtown, and constitutes a vital part of the local community and its atmosphere. In an effort to keep the school small and personal, the student body is restricted to around 12,000 students. The university maintains a surprising student-to-faculty ratio of just eight-to-one.

Rhodes College (Memphis, TN)

Rhodes College is a private, mostly undergraduate, liberal arts college located in Memphis, the old Mississippi River port town that is now the largest city in the state of Tennessee. Established in 1848 by the Freemasons, the college moved to its current 100-acre campus in 1925. The campus is known for its Gothic architecture: 13 of its buildings are on the National Register of Historic Places.

TEXAS

University of Texas (Austin, TX)

The University of Texas (UT) is a public, research university whose flagship campus is located in the state capital of Austin, in the central Texas “hill country.” Founded in 1883, the 423-acre campus is just one mile from the Capitol building, and has the fifth-largest single-campus enrollment in the United States, with more than 50,000 students. Despite supporting a huge student population, the university maintains a 17-to-one student-to-faculty ratio.

The University of Texas at Austin is accredited by the Commission on Colleges of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools.

University of Dallas (Irving, TX)

The University of Dallas (UD) is a private, Catholic university on 744 acres in Irving, a suburb just west of Dallas. The university closely resembles a liberal arts college in that it has established a Core Curriculum to insure that each of student is getting a strong interdisciplinary basis for his or her education. The Core Curriculum comprises 20 classes—about two years of study—in philosophy, theology, history, literature, politics, economics, mathematics, sciences, art, and foreign language. UD traces its roots back to Holy Trinity College, founded in Dallas by the Vincentian order in 1905. The college was reorganized, renamed, and relocated to its present site in 1956.

The University of Dallas is accredited by the Commission on Colleges of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools.

UTAH

Brigham Young University (Provo, UT)

Brigham Young University (BYU) is a private university is Provo, Utah, south of Salt Lake City. Established in 1875, BYU is owned and operated by the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, popularly known as the Mormons. With 34,000 students, the school is the largest religious university in the country, and the third-largest private university. BYU is named after the early Mormon leader, Brigham Young, who led his coreligionists on their westward trek in the 1840s, founding Salt Lake City and what is now the state of Utah.

Brigham Young University is fully accredited by the Northwest Commission on Colleges and Universities.

Westminster College (Salt Lake City, UT)

Founded in 1875 by the United Church of Christ, Westminster College is a private, liberal arts college in the Sugar House neighborhood of Salt Lake City. Westminster College—which should not be confused with several other similarly named institutions—is the only accredited liberal arts school in the state of Utah.

Westminster College is accredited by the Northwest Commission on Colleges and Universities.

VERMONT

University of Vermont (Burlington, VT)

The University of Vermont is a public, research university located on 451 acres in Burlington, which with a population of only about 43,000 is the largest city in the state. Founded in 1791, the same year Vermont attained statehood, this university is the fifth-oldest in the country. It was also the first to pledge not to give preferential admission to anyone based on religious affiliation.

The University of Vermont is accredited by the New England Association of Schools and Colleges.

Bennington College (Bennington, VT)

Bennington College is a private, liberal arts college located in the village of Bennington, tucked into the southwest corner of the state. The school was founded in 1932 as all-women’s college, but made the switch to coed in 1969. Today, about 67 percent of the student body is female, while 33 percent is male.

Bennington College is accredited by the New England Association of Schools and Colleges.

VIRGINIA

University of Virginia (Charlottesville, VA)

The University of Virginia (UVA) is a public, research university whose flagship campus is located in Charlottesville, a town northwest of Richmond not far from Shenandoah National Park in the Blue Ridge Mountains. Established in 1819, the university was conceived and planned by Thomas Jefferson. The third President also designed and oversaw construction of several of the buildings on campus, notably the iconic Rotunda, which he modeled after the Pantheon in Rome, and which was one of the largest buildings in North America at the time. Jefferson also insisted that UVA not be affiliated with any particular religious group—something highly unusual for the times. The university is one of the eight original “Public Ivies,” and one of the very few Southern universities that remained open throughout the Civil War.

The University of Virginia is accredited by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools.

Hampden-Sydney College (Hampden Sydney, VA)

Hampden-Sydney College is a private, liberal arts college for men, located in the small town of Hampden-Sydney, about halfway between Richmond and Lynchburg. Founded in 1775, it was the last college established before the American Revolution and is one of three remaining all-men’s liberal arts colleges in the U.S.

Hampden-Sydney College is accredited by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges.

WASHINGTON

University of Washington (Seattle,WA)

Founded in 1861, the University of Washington (U of W) is a public, research university located in Seattle. It is one of the oldest universities on the West Coast, and is considered a “Public Ivy.” The Seattle campus serves as the flagship school for the University of Washington System. Nearly 43,000 students learn and grow on the striking 703-acre urban campus, which lies on the banks of two local bays between the Cascade Mountain Range to the east and the Olympic Mountains to the west.

Whitman College is accredited by the Northwest Association of Schools and Colleges.

WEST VIRGINIA

West Virginia University (Morgantown, WV)

Founded in 1867, West Virginia University (WVU) is a public, research university located in Morgantown, nestled on the banks of the Monongahela River in the Appalachian Mountains, about 75 miles south of Pittsburgh. The 913-acre campus, which is home to nearly 30,000 students, consists of a cluster of three mini-campuses that are all within close proximity and are linked the Personal Rapid Transit system. This system was built for the sole purpose of eliminating student traffic on local highways.

West Virginia University is accredited by the Higher Learning Commission of the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools.

West Virginia Wesleyan College (Buckhannon, WV)

Founded in 1890 by the United Methodist Church, West Virginia Wesleyan College is a private, coeducational, liberal arts college located in small town of Buckhannon in the mountainous eastern part of the state. The college sits at 1432 feet above sea level. In any given academic year, the school has a student body of approximately 1,400 students, 90 percent of whom live on campus.

West Virginia Wesleyan College is accredited by the Commission on Institutions of Higher Education of the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools.

WISCONSIN

University of Wisconsin-Madison (Madison, WI)

Founded in 1848, the same year Wisconsin entered the union, the University of Wisconsin-Madison is a public, research university whose flagship campus is located in the state capital of Madison, a quintessential “college town” beautifully situated on an isthmus between two lakes. It is the oldest and also the largest public university in the state, and is considered to be one of the “Public Ivies.”

The University of Wisconsin-Madison is accredited by the Higher Learning Commission of the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools.

Beloit College (Beloit, WI)

Beloit College is a private, undergraduate, liberal arts college located in the town of Beloit, south of Janesville on the Wisconsin-Illinois state line. Established in 1846, the college is the oldest continuously operated institution of higher learning in the state. As Beloit was founded by pioneers, the college emphasizes those roots by promoting student sovereignty and agency, varied learning experiences occurring in and out of the classroom, and inner reflection

Beloit College is accredited by the Higher Learning Commission of the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools.

WYOMING

University of Wyoming (Laramie, WY)

The University of Wyoming (UW) is a public, research university located in the town of Laramie, in the southern part of the state between Casper and Fort Collins, Colorado. Established in 1886, four years before Wyoming achieved statehood, the university serves as the flagship school for the University of Wyoming system.

The University of Wyoming system as a whole, including the Laramie campus, is accredited by the Higher Learning Commission.